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Why study at Barts and The London? Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry brings together two venerable teaching institutions: St Bartholomew’s Hospital, which dates back to 1123, and The London Hospital Medical College, founded in 1785, the oldest medical school in England and Wales. The hospitals lie in two very different parts of London, the City and the East End, exposing you to a greater diversity of people and their health problems than at almost any other medical and dental school in the UK.

You will be taught by experts in their field who are passionately engaged with their subject. This is reflected in the high satisfaction rates among our medical students: in the 2014 National Student Survey 94, per cent were satisfied overall with the quality of the course. The programme places considerable emphasis on developing your expertise in a whole range of practical areas, including clinical, communication, observation, team work and management skills.

We have completely eliminated the traditional divide between pre-clinical studies and clinical years, which means that you will start seeing patients from the very falsoirst term.

If you have not already achieved a degree prior to entry, you will have the opportunity (subject to your academic performance) to take an extra year of studies leading to a Bachelor of Science (BSc). Known as an intercalated degree, this may give you a greater choice of career opportunities.

We have modern state-of-the-art buildings alongside more traditional facilities, such as our fantastic library. A major redevelopment of the Royal London Hospital is complete and includes London’s leading trauma and emergency care centre, one of Europe’s largest renal services and one of the UK’s biggest paediatric services.

We pride ourselves on being a friendly School, with excellent staff-student relationships.

Our students are very sociable and committed to the local community through voluntary work and Rag Week – renowned for astounding fundraising feats! There are lots of clubs and societies, and a student association just for medical and dental students.

Finally, the overall positive experience offered to students has been reflected in recent league table positions for 2015 entry; in The Complete University Guide the School was ranked 4thfor Medicine.

Studying medicine is about much more than just getting your MBBS degree and becoming a doctor. Medicine is a vocation and a way of life. It’s about thinking of others and putting your patients first.

It’s a challenging and demanding course – you’ll have lots of work to do and plenty to learn, but you’ll find it highly rewarding. There’s great variety in terms of your workplaces, the patients and illnesses you’ll encounter and the people you’ll work alongside. One of the most important skills you’ll need to develop is teamwork and the ability to communicate well with colleagues, patients and relatives.

Medicine is a tough profession: people who are unwell are not always easy to handle – they may, understandably, be scared or irritable. But you won’t find many doctors who regret their choice of career. With all its challenges, the thrill of being a doctor never leaves you: medicine is exciting and stimulating, and diagnosing and recommending treatments and helping others is intrinsically rewarding.

The five year programme leading to Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery is designed to give you appropriate knowledge and understanding of medical, scientific and clinical principles so that you are able to apply them to the prevention, cure and alleviation of disease.

Practical approach – you study integrated modules relating to the body systems, for example cardiovascular, respiratory etc. Early clinical experience – you will meet your first patient in your first term. Wide-ranging clinical experience in our hospitals in London and the South East – from Year 3, you will undertake a range of clinical and GP attachments. Emphasis on communication skills throughout the programme. Wide choice of Student Selected Components each year where you can follow your own interests, for example: Basic Sciences (Anatomy, Physiology, Pharmacology), to clinical specialisms, community and public health, ethics and law. Many students organise their own SSC’s in an area of Medicine or Medical Science that interests them.

Staff are available to ensure you are supported throughout the programme.

Medicine

Studying medicine is about much more than just getting your MBBS degree and becoming a doctor. Medicine is a vocation and a way of life. It’s about thinking of others and putting your patients first. It’s a challenging and demanding course – you’ll have lots of work to do and plenty to learn, but you’ll find it highly rewarding. There’s great variety in terms of your workplaces, the patients and illnesses you’ll encounter and the people you’ll work alongside. One of the most important skills you’ll need to develop is teamwork and the ability to communicate well with colleagues, patients and relatives.
Medicine is a tough profession: people who are unwell are not always easy to handle – they may, understandably, be scared or irritable. But you won’t find many doctors who regret their choice of career. With all its challenges, the thrill of being a doctor never leaves you: medicine is exciting and stimulating, and diagnosing and recommending treatments and helping others is intrinsically rewarding.
The five year programme leading to Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery is designed to give you appropriate knowledge and understanding of medical, scientific and clinical principles so that you are able to apply them to the prevention, cure and alleviation of disease.
Key features of the curriculum include:
Practical approach – you study integrated modules relating to the body systems, for example cardiovascular, respiratory etc.
Early clinical experience – you will meet your first patient in your first term. Wide-ranging clinical experience in our hospitals in London and the South East – from Year 3, you will undertake a range of clinical and GP attachments. Emphasis on communication skills throughout the programme.
Wide choice of Student Selected Components each year where you can follow your own interests, for example: Basic Sciences (Anatomy, Physiology, Pharmacology), to clinical specialisms, community and public health, ethics and law. Many students organise their own SSC’s in an area of Medicine or Medical Science that interests them.
An element of Problem-Based Learning (PBL).
Staff are available to ensure you are supported throughout the programme.

Learning and teaching

With support from tutors, you are encouraged to develop an independent attitude to learning. This approach prepares you well for life as a qualified doctor. The teaching methods ensure that you can understand the principles of medicine and apply your knowledge in the same way when treating a patient. Important features of our teaching include:

Lectures
Problem-Based Learning (PBL) – this is a central element of the medical curriculum. It is an active way of learning that teaches students problem solving skills and teamwork while at the same time allowing them to acquire basic knowledge.
Practical sessions – these take place in our laboratories, IT labs, clinical skills labs and/or wards.
Communication skills – we provide practical training in interviewing techniques with special sessions devoted to communication between doctors or dentists and their patients.
Project work will bring you in to contact with the local community.
E-learning – this allows you to have access to a large amount of teaching material via ‘the university online environment – an intranet-based facility.
You can revisit lectures and review other teaching materials at your convenience.

Assessment

The pattern of assessment is a combination of continuous assessment and regular examinations throughout the programme, with final exams each year. A scheme of merits and distinctions rewards excellent or outstanding performance across each sector of the curriculum. There is also a comprehensive scheme of prizes to recognise special ability both in the main examinations and in specialist subjects.
Continuous assessment provides you with regular opportunities to consolidate your learning. You can monitor your own progress and teaching staff can identify students who may need additional help with their studies. Continuous assessment takes many forms: short in-course examinations, written accounts of problems or cases studied, poster or clinical or other presentations, log-books, work-books, direct observation or clinical firm grades. This approach results in less end of year cramming and examination stress for students.
End-of-year examinations measure progression through the core curriculum and use a range of innovative assessment methods. Written papers test knowledge and its application to problem solving with extended matching questions, short answer and modified essay questions, often used in conjunction with clinical scenarios. In addition, computer-based exams for anatomy, histology and data interpretation are used in the first two phases of the programme.
Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) are used from the first year of the programme to assess competence in clinical, communication and practical skills. Students move through a series of stations, where they have a specific time to perform a task with a real or simulated patient or a mannequin.

Entry Requirements:

1. Healthy
2. Non-criminal record
3. Non-Chinese citizen
4. Minimum with an educational background equal to high school graduation in China.
5. Language: valid TOEFL or IELTS scores– minimum 93 /237 / 580 for TOEFL, or 6.0 for IELTS, or certificates that can prove the applicant’s English language proficiency.

Application Materials:

1. Photocopy of valid passport
2. Passport photo
3. High school academic transcript
4. High school graduate certificate

Academic experience

I didn't think I would enjoy my degree as much as I have done, you can choose where you're going in a way that you can't at school. At school you are following a track and working towards leaving, whereas here you're working towards the rest of your life.

You can expect an outstanding education at a top university in a supportive and inspiring environment when you study at Queen Mary. You will be taught by academics who are passionate about their subject, and you can enjoy life in one of the world's most exciting cities.

MBBS and BDS as a first degree

Years 1-4: you will be able to apply for the same package of Student Finance and Queen Mary Bursaries as students on other courses ()

Year 5 and beyond: the NHS will pay the tuition fee (non income assessed). For your living costs you can get a £1000 NHS grant (non income assessed), and you can apply for an income assessed NHS Bursary for living costs (in 2012/13 this was up to £3392 for students living away from home). You will also be able to apply to Student Finance England for a non income assessed reduced rate Maintenance Loan. In 2013/14 this is £2498 for final year students living away from home. You will not be eligible for a Queen Mary Bursary.

Living and other costs

On top of your tuition fees, you will have several other major expenses to budget for. The largest and most essential of these costs is probably your accommodation. On the plus side, our location in the east of London means cheaper rents than elsewhere in London. Other expenses to take into consideration are: travel, food and drink, phone bills, social activities, course books and clothes.

UCAS provides a useful budget calculator.
You can download a guide to planning a personal budget, including a guide to living costs.
It is important for you to balance your income and expenditure in advance. Depending on your lifestyle, living in London for a year will normally cost you on average £9,500 (excluding tuition fees) at 2010-11 prices. You should allow at least an additional £1,500 for each dependant. Bear in mind that a full 52-week year will cost more.
International students can find more detailed information on the cost of living in London and how to plan finances.

Financial support for Home and EU students

Students who are UK residents should apply as early as possible to Student Finance England (or equivalent in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland), who will determine your eligibility for a:
tuition fee loan
maintenance loan
maintenance grant.
If you are a non-UK national of the European Union you can apply to the Student Finance EU Team for a loan to pay your tuition fees.
The loan for tuition fees is not available to undergraduate students from outside the EU. Some EU nationals are entitled to the full package of Student Finance that is available to UK students, and which includes funding for living costs in additional to a tuition fee loan. For more information, see: www.welfare.qmul.ac.uk/documents/leaflets/funding/39689.pdf
You start to pay your tuition fee loan back after completing your degree, once you are earning more than £21,000 a year. You should apply for Student Finance once you have applied to university – you do not need to wait until you have an offer or have decided where to study. Entitlement to Student Finance is subject to residence, immigration status and previous study criteria. Contact the Advice and Counselling Service at Queen Mary for advice about your eligibility.
For detailed information about all the different elements of Student Finance you can receive, additional sources of funding, information for graduates and information about NHS-funded years of study, see: www.welfare.qmul.ac.uk/documents/leaflets/funding/39689.pdf
You may also find it helpful to visit:
https://www.gov.uk/browse/education/student-finance

Confidential advice

If you would like individual confidential advice about your eligibility for funding, planning your budget or any other financial or practical issue, please contact the Advice and Counselling Service at Queen Mary: www.welfare.qmul.ac.uk
You are welcome to use this service if you are considering applying to Queen Mary.

Queen Mary bursaries

Queen Mary offers student bursaries to help with the costs of higher education. These bursaries are aimed at students from lower-income households. The amount of the bursary you receive each year will depend on your household income which is assessed during your application for UK Government Financial Support. Please note that all international students and those EU nationals who are only eligible for a tuition fee loan will not be eligible for a Queen Mary bursary. To find out if you are eligible, see: http://www.qmul.ac.uk/undergraduate/feesandfunding/

Queen Mary and Westfield Alumni student bursaries

We offer two annual student bursaries worth £3,000 (£1,000 for each of the three years) to eligible students who have received their secondary education in the London Boroughs of Tower Hamlets, Newham, Hackney or the City of London.

Barts and The London Alumni Association student bursary

The Geoffrey Flavell Student Bursary of £2,000 over three years is awarded annually to one eligible student studying for an MBBS medical qualification. The award provides £1,000 in the first year and two subsequent instalments of £500 each.

Aldgate and Allhallows foundation scholarships

The Aldgate and Allhallows foundation provides scholarships over the duration of the course to undergraduate entrants who are permanent residents of either the City of London or the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. Candidates must also meet other specific eligibility criteria regarding age and means of support.

The John Abernethy (Barts) Scholarship

To encourage applications from students in financial hardship who would benefit from the MBBS programme, the trustees of St Bartholomew’s Hospital Medical College Trust are pleased to offer these new scholarships to two new medical students and one new dental student each year. The John Abernethy (Barts) Scholarships, named after the founder of the Barts Medical College, will be worth £3,500 for each of the five years of the course – subject to the holders’ satisfactory progress each year. The scholarships have been designed to assist students who, despite exceptional academic ability and their aptitude for a medical or dental career, might not be able to undertake the course for financial reasons. All students who enrol in the School of Medicine and Dentistry are considered for the scholarships, which are awarded on the basis of household income (which is reviewed annually) and the attainment of at least three grade ‘A’ A-levels taken in the same sitting. Students’ performance in their Fundamentals of Medicine / Dental Module (at the end of their first term) will also be a major criterion.You do not have to apply formally to be considered for one of these prestigious scholarships. Instead, the School of Medicine and Dentistry will receive the relevant financial and academic information after you have enrolled and, depending on the Fundamentals of Medicine / Dental results, will recommend the two best medical students and one best dental student who also meet the financial requirements to the trustees for their approval. Additionally, the School will report annually to the trustees on the scholarship holders’ academic performance.
For further details and eligibility criteria, visit: http://www.qmul.ac.uk/undergraduate/feesandfunding/tuitionfees/bursaries/index.html

Access to Learning Fund (ALF)

Each year the government gives the College money to help students in financial hardship. To apply to the ALF you must have taken out your maximum maintenance loan entitlement. You can apply to the ALF for help towards the difference between your income and basic expenses. You can also apply for help if you have a sudden financial emergency or special circumstances or costs that other students might not have. You do not normally have to repay a payment from the ALF. The amounts available to students through the ALF are strictly limited, and the Fund can in no way be regarded as a substitute for other finance.

Hardship funds

The Barts and The London Alumni Association Benevolent Funds also offer grants and loans to medical and dental students in financial hardship, and bursaries to students undertaking final-year electives, on the recommendation of the appropriate committees of the School. Donations from generations of former students have made it possible to offer such assistance.

Part-time jobs

East London will provide you with plenty of opportunities to work and earn extra money during your studies. However, the School would not recommend that you spend more than 15 hours a week in paid employment, so as not to have a detrimental impact on your studies. International students may also be eligible to work in the UK. If you are registered on a full-time course of six months or longer, then you will be eligible to work for a maximum of 20 hours per week during term time. Queen Mary’s comprehensive Careers team provides information, advice and guidance on searching for part-time jobs. Many part-time jobs are paid close to the minimum wage, which from October 2013 is £6.31 per hour if you are 21 or over, and £5.03 if you are aged 18-20. Many employers pay more than the minimum wage. If you work 15 hours per week and are aged 18, this would generate an income of at least £75.45per week, which could cover food and/or social activities (although there will be deductions for income tax if you work during term time). Do not forget, you also have a summer break, a portion of which you could spend in full-time employment and give your Student Finance a significant boost.
For information about part-time work, including income tax rules for students, see: www.welfare.qmul.ac.uk/documents/leaflets/working/5002.pdf
For details of the minimum wage, see: https://www.gov.uk/browse/working/tax-minimum-wage

Further advice

The Advice and Counselling Service at Queen Mary offers detailed advice and guidance on all the aspects of student finance, and more. It also offers advice to international students about all the financial, practical and immigration related aspects of studying at Queen Mary.
Contact the Advice and Counselling Service on:
Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8717

All applications for undergraduate degree courses at Queen Mary, including those from mature students, should be made through the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS).

Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS)

Applications are online, and can be made at: www.ucas.com. Further details on the applications process can be obtained from the UCAS website in the Applying Online Guide.

Alternatively you can phone UCAS on 0870 1122211 or email enquiries@ucas.ac.uk

UCAS will start receiving applications from mid-September for entry in the following autumn.

Applications from UK-based applicants should reach UCAS by 15 January, although, at their discretion, institutions may consider applications received up until 30 June. Later deadlines apply to international applicants but early application is recommended for popular and oversubscribed courses.

You may list up to five choices of institution/course on your UCAS form, except for medicine and dentistry where you can apply for up to four courses in these subjects; the other two choices can be for other subjects or left blank. If you wish to apply to the same institution for more than one degree course, you should make a separate entry for each choice. You should list your choices in alphabetical order or the Institution code name taking care to clearly enter the details for courses and institutions.

Institutions will only be able to access relevant choices on your UCAS record, details of applications made to other institutions will only be made available after you have replied to your offers. It may be helpful for applicants to know that selectors at Queen Mary will not be influenced by the presence or absence of an indication on the UCAS entry form that it would be possible for the applicant to live at home.

UCAS Extra

Queen Mary University of London welcomes enquiries and applications from anyone wishing to take part in the UCAS Extra Scheme.

What is UCAS Extra?

If you find yourself without an offer, for whatever reason, and you have used all five choices already, Extra helps you to have an additional choice through UCAS. This means you do not have to wait until Clearing to continue to find a place.
The Extra procedure operates from mid-March to the end of June.

Can I take part in UCAS Extra?

have had unsuccessful or withdrawal decisions from all five of your choices OR

have cancelled outstanding choices and have no offers OR

have declined all your offers.

Remember that you must have used all five choices on your UCAS application form to become eligible for Extra. If you initially used fewer than five choices you are able to add choices in the main scheme.

Extra vacancies will appear on the UCAS website.

Yes! If you

Offline Application Procedures

We will consider Extra applications for all our courses except the following:

A100 Medicine

A101 Medicine (Graduate Entry)

A200 Dentistry

Medical and dental students

All applicants will be required to sit the UK CAT for all our undergraduate programmes in Medicine and Dentistry. This test assesses applicants' aptitude for medical and dental study alongside the currently published academic and non cognitive entry requirements.
Further information can be accessed through participating universities, UCAS and UK CAT's web sites providing information about the test and how to register.
Further information on the admissions requirements for our undergraduate programmes in Medicine and Dentistry can be found at:
www.smd.qmul.ac.uk/admissions/
The institution code for Medicine A100 and Dentistry A200 is Q50 and applicants must enter a campus code 'W' in box 3d of the UCAS application form for these programmes only.

International applicants

Application process: step-by-step guide [Please note that all links in this section open in a new window]
Step 1: Select your course of study from our list of undergraduate courses.
Step 2: Academic entry requirements
We accept a broad range of overseas qualifications. Consult our country/region specific information to find out whether you have the right qualifications. If your qualifications are not listed, please contact us for further information.
Step 3: English language and foundation courses
If your first language is not English you must be able to provide recent evidence that your spoken and written command of the English language is adequate for the programmes for which you have applied. Please see the full list of our English language requirements.
Step 4: Applying to Queen Mary
All undergraduate applications should be made through UCAS (see details above).
The College International Office will be happy to give informal advice about your application on +44 (0)20 7882 3066 or email: international-office@qmul.ac.uk.

Transfer and advanced entry

In some departments it is possible for students to join undergraduate degree programmes at the beginning of the second or, sometimes, the beginning of the third year of studies. If you are applying for advanced status on the basis of an approved post-A-level qualification, such as the BTEC HND, you should apply via UCAS in the usual way. If you wish to transfer your degree studies from another UK higher education institution you will be considered on the basis of your current syllabus, academic references and results. All candidates must have the approval of, and be eligible to proceed to the next year of studies at, their current institution. Applications must be submitted via UCAS.
The Admissions and Recruitment Office is happy to advise on enquiries from potential transfer and international entry applicants.
The classification of your award will be in accordance with the regulations for your programme of study, and will normally be based on the work that you complete at Queen Mary.

Equal opportunities

Queen Mary welcomes students from all over the world. The College Charter states that our work will be carried out in a spirit of tolerance, freedom of opinion, mutual concern and community service, and undertakes to avoid discrimination against any person on the grounds of age, marital/civil partnership status, sex, disability, race, colour, religious or political beliefs, ethnic or national origin, sexual orientation, transgender status or family circumstances.
The College has a policy statement on Equal Opportunities in Employment, which we are actively implementing.

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